Posts Tagged ‘DOMA

09
Jul
13

GOP Move to Ban Rainbow Flag, or “Republicans will find any excuse to be a jerk to the queer community.”

Louisiana Republican Introduces Bill To Ban LGBT Rainbow Flag From Public Buildings | ThinkProgress.

Here we go again. A in Louisiana war veteran saw a picture of a Pride Flag being hoisted after the DOMA Supreme Court decision, and decided he was offended. This seemed so important to a Parish-Councilman that he decided to write legislation banning all “non-governmental” flags.

What really gets me here is that the GOP is trying to walk this back as “not against the gays.” But the words used by the offended veteran are:

 

I did not go overseas and fight for our country so that we could come back and be subject to something like that. Several of us feel that the flying of this flag is a poke in the eye of a way of life.

To me that reads of “I didn’t serve in the military and fight for our country to come back and have to see people being queer in public. Seeing that flag flying grosses us out.”

I have a great deal of respect for military personnel and the sacrifices they make. However, it doesn’t make your viewpoints any more valid or important than anyone else’s. People were hoisting the Pride Flag as a victory celebration for one of the biggest steps forward for our community in the history of this country. No other flags were taken down for the ceremony, and the Pride Flag wasn’t flown above any US flags.

Really, doesn’t Louisiana have more pressing issues than the Pride Flag? It sounds like just another excuse to kick dirt in the face of the LGBTQ community.

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02
Jul
13

The GOP Can’t Let Go, or “How Republicans feel the need to proclaim their homophobic bigotry as often as possible.”

Tim Huelskamp Introduces Constitutional Amendment Banning Gay Marriage.

The ink is barely dry in the Supreme Court’s declaration that the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, and already Republicans are clamoring to enshrine anti-LGBT bigotry into the US Constitution. Congressman Heulskamp from Kansas has introduced a constitutional amendment to restrict marriage to one man and one woman throughout the US. Already, 28 Republican legislators have signed on as sponsors.

Now, given the make-up of the US Congress, and the composition of the state legislatures, this amendment has absolutely ZERO chance of passing. But the mere existence and introduction of such an item is a degree of bigotry that makes my stomach turn. Essentially, upon hearing that the Supreme Court had decided that they could no longer legally repress and discriminate against gays, these Republicans basically decided to stomp their feat like obstinate children and scream “BUT WE DON’T WANNA BE NICE!” Their homophobia is so profound that they want legal discrimination written into our Constitution. It’s sad. It’s disgusting. And they should be mocked and ridiculed for their outdated, hateful, bigoted views at every turn.

Now, we still don’t have immigration reform. We still don’t have budget agreements. We haven’t reformed the FISA Court. We have still have a jobs problem. But the GOP wants to waste more time fighting for their right to treat LGBT people like second class citizens.

Shame on you, Mr Huelskamp. And shame on all those supporting this amendment. And if the GOP leadership is foolish enough let this see even a peak of daylight, shame on them too. The voters will remember this.

26
Jun
13

A Day of Victory for Gay Marriage, or “Believe it or not, the Equal Protection clause applies to everyone, not just white, straight, cisgender people.”

DOMA ruled uncostitutional: Full Supreme Court opinion | WJLA.com.

Hollingsworth v. Parry (Prop 8) Full Text via HuffPo

So today was a big day for queer rights in the United States, but not quite as big of a day as we had hoped. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court broadly struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, which prevented federal recognition of otherwise legal same-sex marriages, as a violation of the Equal Protection Clause. In a related matter, the Supreme Court found that a group of proponents of Proposition 8 in California (which overturned the legality of same-sex marriage in that state) did not have the legal standing to continue the appeal after the State refused to continue to defend the voter-approved initiative. The high court had the opportunity to make a wider ruling on overall legality of same-sex marriage, but chose a much narrower scope, as predicted by many court watchers.

So what does this all mean? Well, the biggest thing is means is that United State federal government will have to treat all marriages equally, no matter the genders of the couple. This means significant tax benefits, social security survivor benefits, military spouse benefits, and much more. I think it also puts some pressure on the states to re-examine their so called “Definition of Marriage” laws. For the majority opinion penned by Justice Kennedy:

DOMA’s principal effect is to identify a subset of state-sanctioned marriages and make them unequal. The principal purpose is to impose inequality, not for other reasons like governmental efficiency.

Kennedy’s entire opinion is very indicting of the entire concept of DOMA, and I cried several times while reading it. Not surprisingly, the conservative members of the Court were sour eggs on the entire thing, and the dissenting opinions reflect their continued homophobia. From Justice Alito’s dissent:

At present, no one—including social scientists, philosophers, and historians—can predict with any certainty what the long-term ramifications of widespread acceptance of same-sex marriage will be.

Alito is invoking the age-old- and completely unfounded- homophobic worries about the “dangers” that queer people pose to society at large. Scalia, ever the charmer, reinforces his protestations from Lawerence v Texas that laws may mandate “sexual norms” and makes the same tired comparison of same-sex marriage to polygamy:

As I have observed before, the Constitution does not forbid the government to enforce traditional moral and sexual norms. See Lawrence v.Texas, 539 U. S. 558, 599(2003) (SCALIA , J., dissenting). I will not swell the U. S. Reports with restatements of that point. It is enough to say that the Constitution neither requires nor forbids our society to approve of same-sex marriage, much as it neither requires nor forbids us to approve of no-fault divorce, polygamy, or the consumption of alcohol. 

There are many more gems like this sprinkled through all the dissents.

The case involving Prop 8 in California, Hollingsworth v Perry, is a much different beast. If you don’t remember, the legislators of the State of California approved same sex marriage several years ago. Then a pack of angry, well-funded Christian Right groups pushed forward with a referendum that forced a state-constitution amendment that banned gay marriage. The entire matter ended up in Federal district court, where the proposition was a struck down. At this point, the State decided to not pursue any appeals in the matter. However, the proponents of Prop 8 pushed on with the appeals in the State’s stead. Today, the Supreme Court rules that those proponents did not have any legal standing to do so, as they were not seeking remedy for any “personal and tangible harm.” So this means that gay marriage is once again legal in the state of California, but it’s broader implications are limited. In many ways, this is a punt by the Court. The one positive thing here, however, is that reinforces the notion that the angry Christian Right activists have absolutely no standing to force the courts to continue to consider appeals on any gay-marriage decisions if the States are no longer interested in defending their “one-man-one-woman” marriage laws.

Overall, today is definitely a day to celebrate a victory for queer rights in our country, and I’m overjoyed at the progress made today. However, we we still have MANY states where gay marriage remains illegal, and many places where LGBT discrimination remains perfectly legal. So, today may be a major battle win, but the war is far from over. Let’s carry this enthusiasm onwards and continue our push for equality for all!

 




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